"Delicate Offense", A glass jewellery collection by Loo Xing Yu Jacqueline.

A marriage between sturdy weapons and brittle glass, Delicate Offense contradicts the impression that weapons are supposed to be made highly durable.


Written by Loo Xing Yu Jacqueline | Edited by: Circular Connection


"Delicate Offense", A glass jewellery collection by Loo Xing Yu, Jacqueline.

Photo Courtesy of Loo Xing Yu Jacqueline.


 
“What was once a tool to defend or to bring harm to others is so brittle that it can hardly be effective and can potentially injure oneself.”

- Loo Xing Yu Jacqueline


This project's main aim was to explore the theme of Contradiction. While there are countless ways to interpret such a broad theme, this project focuses on the origin story behind how the Chinese term for “Contradiction”, “矛盾 (máo dùn)”, came to be.


The story behind how the Chinese term for “Contradiction”, “矛盾”, is one from ancient China. Once, there was a weapon peddler who sold a spear at the market and claimed, “This spear(矛) is so sharp that it could pierce through everything!” Next, he presented a shield and boasted, “This shield(盾) is so solid that nothing can pierce though it!” A wise man who had heard both of his pitches then asked him, “What would happen then, if your spear struck your shield?” The peddler did not have an answer and thus the term “矛盾” was born.

Why the collection is called "Delicate Offense"?


A marriage between sturdy weapons and brittle glass, Delicate Offense contradicts the impression that weapons are supposed to be made highly durable.

The chosen title, “Delicate Offense”, are contradictory words that depict a marriage between sturdy weapons and brittle glass, both materialized in the form of a jewellery collection, which will contradict the impression that weapons are supposed to be made highly durable and able to withstand high impact.


To incorporate a weapon into a piece of jewellery would require compatible shapes and forms. As such, melee weapons such as Katars, Knuckledusters and the Kongosho are most suitable as they are originally to be worn on the hands much like a jewellery. Weapons with long forms such as the Kusari or a Flail could also act as necklaces as they possess the length to drape around the neck.


As the strength of working with glass is in the myriad of colours available, bright colours that are borrowed from aposematism in nature will be used. Aposematism is the usage of warning colours by preys as they confront their predators, which is very similar to the concept of a weapon. This can commonly be found in amphibians, reptiles and insects.

The collection consists of two items: A necklace in the form of a Kusari, and a double ring/hand-piece in the form of a Bagh Nakh.


1. The Kusari

The collection consists of two items: A necklace in the form of a Kusari, and a double ring/hand-piece in the form of a Bagh Nakh.

Photo Courtesy of Loo Xing Yu Jacqueline.


The Kusari, literally “chain” in Japanese, is often used in self-defense. In terms of colours, blue and various shades of orange were used to mimic the colours of the aposematic Ring-necked Snake. The shape of each chain link is also inspired by the shape of snake scales itself and depicts a snake slithering around the wearer’s neck.


2. The Bagh Nakh

The collection consists of two items: A necklace in the form of a Kusari, and a double ring/hand-piece in the form of a Bagh Nakh.

Photo Courtesy of Loo Xing Yu Jacqueline.


The Bagh Nakh, also known as the “Tiger Claw”, has claws concealed beneath the palm. Colours of the hand-piece will be reminiscent of the Poison Dart Frog who is always ready to leap at predators. Just like the necklace, it features different shades of blue and orange.


Project Information

Name: Delicate Offense 「毅碎」

Designer: Loo Xing Yu Jacqueline

Materials: Soft Glass

Year: 2018



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